Exegetical and Hermeneutical Commentary of Revelation 22:8 – Bible Commentary

Exegetical and Hermeneutical Commentary of Revelation 22:8

And I John saw these things, and heard [them.] And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things.

8. And I John saw &c.] Lit. and I John [ am ] he that saw and heard (or “heard and saw”) these things. It is possible to connect these words with the immediately preceding sentence, regarding it, not as a continuation of the angel’s speech, but as the beginning of St John’s reflexion, “Blessed is he that keepeth the words, &c., and [blessed am] I John, who see and hear these things.” It was so understood by St Dionysius of Alexandria in the third century, and this construction is the easiest and smoothest grammatically. But few modern commentators accept this view: it seems inappropriate to the context.

I fell down to worship ] As at Rev 19:10. Some suppose that St John is here repeating his statement of what he did then, but it is far more natural to understand that he did the same again. The words “I come quickly” would even more naturally lead him to think that this angel was “He that is to come,” than the words of that angel (who may or may not have been the same as this) led him to think that he was the God Whose “true sayings” he communicated.

Fuente: The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges

And I John saw these things, and heard them – That is, I saw the parts that were disclosed by pictures, visions, and symbols; I heard the parts that were communicated by direct revelation.

And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel, … – As he had done on a former occasion. See the notes on Rev 19:10. John appears to have been entirely overcome by the extraordinary nature of the revelations made to him, and not improbably entertained some suspicion that it was the Redeemer himself who had manifested himself to him in this remarkable manner.

Fuente: Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible

Verse 8. I fell down to worship] I prostrated myself before him as before a superior being, to express my gratitude, and give him thanks for the communications he had made. See on Re 19:10.

Fuente: Adam Clarke’s Commentary and Critical Notes on the Bible

I John saw these things; I saw the vision.

And heard them; I heard the words spoken to me relating to them.

Fuente: English Annotations on the Holy Bible by Matthew Poole

8. Both here and in Rev 19:9;Rev 19:10, the apostle’s fallingat the feet of the angel is preceded by a glorious promise to theChurch, accompanied with the assurance, that “These are the truesayings of God,” and that those are “blessed” who keepthem. Rapturous emotion, gratitude, and adoration, at the prospect ofthe Church’s future glory transport him out of himself, so as all butto fall into an unjustifiable act; contrast his opposite feeling atthe prospect of the Church’s deep fall [AUBERLEN],see on Re 17:6; Re19:9, 10.

saw . . . and heardA,B, Vulgate, and Syriac transpose these verbs. Translateliterally, “I John (was he) who heard and saw these things.”It is observable that in Re 19:10,the language is, “I fell before his feet to worship him”;but here, “I fell down to worship (God?) before the feetof the angel.” It seems unlikely that John, when once reproved,would fall into the very same error again. BENGEL’Sview, therefore, is probable; John had first intended to worship theangel (Re 19:10), but nowonly at his feet intends to worship (God). The angel does noteven permit this.

Fuente: Jamieson, Fausset and Brown’s Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And I John saw these things, and heard them,…. He was both an eye and an ear witness; some things he saw, and others he heard; and to render his testimony the more authentic, he puts his name to it; and he being an apostle of Christ, and a man of great sincerity and probity, is to be believed.

And when I had heard and seen; the things related in this book, being amazed at them, and filled with joy on account of many of them, and firmly believing the whole as coming from God:

I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things. This is the second time John did so, though warned of it, and rebuked for it, which shows the proneness even of good men to fall into sin again and again; and what a propensity there is in mankind to idolatry; and very likely this might be suffered, that a second reproof might be given, and repeated instructions be on record, to prevent the worshipping of angels, introduced in the first ages of Christianity.

Fuente: John Gill’s Exposition of the Entire Bible

And I John ( ). Here John the Seer is the speaker. He had already given his name (Rev 1:1; Rev 1:4; Rev 1:9). Here he claims to be the “one who hears and sees these things” ( ).

I fell down to worship ( ). Second aorist active indicative of (with form) and the first aorist active infinitive of purpose of . It was a natural, though a wrong, thing to do, especially after Christ’s own voice followed that of the angel “which shewed me these things” ( ). Genitive singular of the articular present active participle of . Cf. Rev 1:1; Rev 4:1; Rev 17:1; Rev 21:9; Rev 22:1; Rev 22:6.

Fuente: Robertson’s Word Pictures in the New Testament

I John saw [ ] . The A. V. overlooks the article with the participle – the one seeing. Hence Rev., correctly, I John am he that heard and saw.

Had heard and seen [ ] . Aorist tense. There is no need of rendering it as a pluperfect. Rev., rightly, I heard and saw. The appeal to hearing and seeing is common to all John’s writings. See Joh 1:14; Joh 19:35; Joh 21:14; I Joh 1:1, 2; Joh 4:14.

Fuente: Vincent’s Word Studies in the New Testament

THE FINAL MESSAGE OF THE BIBLE v. 8-19

1) “And I John saw these things and heard them,” (kago loannes ho akouon kai blepon) “And I, John, am the one who saw and heard these things; this certifies the writer of the book; it is a straightforward, acknowledged record from God, to John, about Jesus Christ, conveyed to him by Inspiration and by word of mouth from God the Father, Jesus Christ, and Holy Angels.

2) “And when I had heard and seen,” (kai hote ekousa kai eblepsa) “And when I heard and saw; this final vision of the place, the persons, and the glory of the New Jerusalem and the New Heaven and New earth, Rev 21:1 to Rev 22:21, as afore shown and reported by one of the seven Angels, Rev 21:9; Rev 21:15; Rev 21:17; Rev 22:1; Rev 22:6; Rev 22:8-9.

3) “I fell down to worship,” (epesa proskunesai) “I fell prostate (down) to worship,” with adoration, but the communicating angel, who had shown and informed him of this new heaven, earth, Jerusalem and her occupants, Rev 21:9; Rev 19:10.

4) “Before the feet of the angel,” (emprosthen ton podon tou angelou) “in the face of (before the presence of) the angel,” but angels are servants of God and of his children. They are not to be worshipped, Rev 19:10.

5) “Which shewed me these things,” (tou deiknuontos moi tauta) “The one which showed to me these things, Tho good angels and men may do service to the redeemed, neither angels nor men are objects of Divine worship or good enough to be worshipped, Heb 1:14; only God is to be worshipped and served, not men, angels or devils, Mat 4:10; Luk 4:8.

Fuente: Garner-Howes Baptist Commentary

Strauss Comments
SECTION 72

Text Rev. 22:8-9

8 And I John am he that heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel that showed me these things. 9 And he saith unto me, See thou do it not: I am a fellow-servant with thee and with thy brethren the prophets, and with them that keep the words of this book: worship God.

Initial Questions Rev. 22:8-9

1.

Should not John know that Christians are not supposed to worship angels Rev. 22:8?

2.

Does the angel accept Johns worship Rev. 22:9?

3.

What does the angel command that John do Rev. 22:9?

Rev. 22:8

John failed to learn his lesson from the heavenly messenger in Rev. 19:10. John attempted to worship an angel and the angel rebuked him. Here again, John fell to worship before the feet of the angel who had revealed the holy secrets to him. The following rebuke is in harmony with the general biblical attack on the flourishing angel-worship in Asia Minor.

Rev. 22:9

John was emphatically rebuked the second time. John was so emotionally involved as he was trying to write down the last words of the angels message that he became more enthralled with the messenger than with his good tidings. The angel declared that he was a faithful follower of the Word of God, but that this did not give him any special standing before God. Even angels are creatures and not the creator.

Discussion Questions

See Rev. 22:20-21.

Fuente: College Press Bible Study Textbook Series

(8) And I John saw these things . . .Or rather, And I John am he who hears and sees these things. The words of the angel are confirmed by the words of Christ. Now we have the confirmatory testimony of the seer to the truth of the vision. The declaration reminds us of the opening of the Epistle of St. John: That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you (1Jn. 1:1-3). It is no mere dream or ingenious fancy of his own that he has recorded; it is a veritable revelation.

And when I had heard . . .Or better, When I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who was showing me these things. Wonder and awe took possession of the seer, and for the second time he was about to offer unlawful homage to the angel-minister. (Comp. Rev. 19:10.) This twice offered and twice refused worship is full of teaching. To render to all their due is wise and seemly and Christ-like; to offer exaggerated homage to any is to invert Gods order, and to degrade by pretending to exalt man, whose true glory is that he is Gods creation.

Fuente: Ellicott’s Commentary for English Readers (Old and New Testaments)

8. Saw and heard What God sent his angel to show.

These things The apocalyptic showings and sayings.

I fell down Re-narrating here the fact of Rev 19:10, to show that so truly divine seemed this apocalypse that he came near to worshipping the mere messenger that brought it.

Fuente: Whedon’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

‘And I, John, am the one who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw I fell down to venerate at the feet of the angel who showed me these things, and he says to me, “See that you do not do it. I am a fellow-servant with you and your brothers the prophets and with those who keep the words of this book. Worship God”.’

The writer first confirms who he is, that he is the John whom everyone will know, and that his information is first hand. Then he informs us of what was a natural reaction to what he had experienced. He fell before the angel in awe and reverence. But even this was not to be. The angel strongly forbids such behaviour and stresses that such should only be shown to God. Man is ever slow to learn this lesson. None is to be venerated but God.

Over the last two thousand years these words have been constantly ignored. Fallen man, when he rejects idolatry and yet fails to come to Jesus Christ in full trust and obedience, loves to replace idols with other substitutes. This is so whether they be Mary or the so-called saints or angels. The angels stricture applies equally here. They too were fellow-servants and are not to be shown veneration, which is all too similar to full worship. They become substitutes for God and barriers against a full knowledge of Him. We must remember the words of the angel. “See you do not do it”. But he is not saying that all men are on a level with angels. Rather he is saying that those who have truly responded to Christ are raised in status to that of the angels, ‘fellow-servants’ of God.

Fuente: Commentary Series on the Bible by Peter Pett

Rev 22:8-21. John saw these things, and heard, &c. St. John testifies himself to have been the person who saw and heard these things; and in his extasy falling into the same mistake which he had committed, ch. Rev 19:10 he is gently corrected in the same manner by the angel; who orders him, Rev 22:10 not to seal up this prophesy, as Daniel’s was (ch. Rev 12:4-9.); for the time is at hand;some of the particulars would very soon be accomplished, as indeed all would in their due season: which he farther enforces, Rev 22:11-15 with promises and threatenings, of rewards to the righteous, and of vengeance to the wicked. It was not thought sufficient to represent the angel speaking in the person of Christ, but Christ himself is also introduced, Rev 22:16 speaking in his own person, confirming the divine authority of this book, and attesting it to be properly his revelation concerning the churches: The Spirit and the bride, Rev 22:17. (that is, the spiritual bride,the true church of Christ,) therefore receives it, and ardently wishes for its completion. The book being of this importance, a solemn adjuration is addedby Christ himself, that no man presume to add any thing to it, or take any thing from it, Rev 22:18-19. He who testifieth these things, saith, Surely I come quickly, Rev 22:20. He not only attests them to be true, but will also come speedily to accomplish them: to which St. John answers, and in him the whole church, Amen. Even so; Come, Lord Jesus! He closes all with the usual apostolical benediction, Rev 22:21 wishing the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ to the churches of Asia in particular, and to all Christians in general. The conclusion is truly excellent, as well as all other parts of this book; and nothing could be contrived to leave these things with a stronger impression upon the minds of the readers. In the whole, from first to last, appears the majesty of the divine Revealer,the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the author and finisher of every good work, and of this more particularly. This is the sure word of prophesy, whereunto Christians, as St. Peter says, do well to take heed and attend. 2Pe 1:19. Attention then to this book is recommended to us, upon the authority of St. Peter, as well as of the writer, St. John: a double blessing, as we have seen in the book itself, is pronounced upon those who shall study and observe it; first in ch. Rev 1:3 and here again, ch. Rev 22:7. Emboldened by which blessings, with Nehemiah we would pray, “Remember us, O my God, concerning this also, and spare us according to the greatness of thy mercy!Neh 13:22. We would observe with the pious and excellent Dr. Doddridge, our faithful and useful companion through the writings of the New Testament,How sweetlyand delightfully the canon of scripture concludes, leaving as it were the music of heaven upon the attentive ear! O thou blessed Root and Offspring of David! O thou bright and morning star! impress on all our hearts these thy gracious words which thou halt condescended to speak from the throne of thy glory! thereby as it were to aid the weaknessof our faith in those which thou didst deliver while dwelling in mortal flesh: then did the compassionate Saviour proclaim from an eminence in the temple, to a crowded assembly, on a day of peculiar solemnity, If any man thirst, let him come unto me and drink; Joh 7:37. And now, behold he makes the same proclamation from his celestial temple; he points as it were to the fountainhead of happiness, to the springs of the water of life near the throne of God; and says, whoever will, let him come, let him take, let him freely take of this living water, Rev 22:17. Yea, and not content with speaking this language by his Spirit only, he calls on his bride, to lift up her melodious voice, to publish this kind invitation. He calls on every one who hears it, to echo it back, as if the excess of his goodness overcame him, as if it were necessary to his happiness that men should accept of their own salvation.

With what sacred observance should these books be guarded, which contain a message of such infinite importance! of what dreadful curses are they worthy, who presume to add to what is already perfect, or to take away from that, which is in every part divine! Rev 22:18. God forbid that any of us should ever presumptuously attempt to do it! And may we be preserved from those mistaken interpretations, in consequence of which we might teach the world, asby His authority, any thing which He has not dictated; or deny any thing which carries with it the stamp of such an authority! Have pity, O Lord, upon our weakness! Impute not prejudices which thou knowest we do not allow; and give us a greater penetration of mind, to understand the true sense of thy word; a simplicity of heart to receive it; an integrity, so far as the duty of our stations requires, to declare, and a zeal to inculcate and defend it.

Whilewearethusemployed,oremployedin any other services which Providence may assign us;whatever labours may exercise;whatever difficulties may surround; whatever sorrows may depress; whatever malice, misrepresentation, or calumny may vex us; may it be our pleasure to hear the Lord of our love proclaiming, “Behold, I come quickly:I come to put a period to the trials and suffering of my servants. I come, and my reward of grace is with me, to recompense with royal bounty every work of faith and labour of love. I come to receive my faithful persevering people to myself, to dwell for ever in that blissful world, where the sacred volume which contains the important discoveries of my will shall be no more necessary; but knowledge, and holiness, and joy, shall be poured in upon their souls, in a more immediate, a more noble, and a more effectual manner;” Amen! even so, come, Lord Jesus! hasten the blessed hour to us, and to all the churches, so far as it may consist with thy wise and holy counsels; and, in the mean time, may thy grace be with us, to keep alive the remembrance of thy love, and the expectation of thy coming, in our hearts; and to animate us to a temper and conduct which may suit the blessings we have already received, and the nobler felicity after which thou hast taught us to aspire! Amen, and Amen.

Inferences.Let us again contemplate the new Jerusalem with new and growing delight. Let us raise our eyes to the water of life, which issues from the throne of God and the Lamb: to the tree of life, which grows on its banks, and produces such a variety of fruit, both for food and refreshment, and for the healing of the nations; to that more excellent paradise, in which there shall be no curse, where, from the throne of God and of the Lamb, shall be scattered ten thousand blessings on all his servants; who shall there serve him, with everlasting, with increasing delight, being admitted to see his face, and exulting in their having the name of God written upon their foreheads: which they reckon a brighter and nobler ornament, than the most glorious crown, or diadem, without such an inscription, could be. These are the words of truth and faithfulness; and, as such, may our faith embrace them, and our souls ever rest upon them.

O that we may feel our thirst after this water of life, our hunger after this fruit of the tree of life, powerfully and perseveringly excited. We shall then in both respects, be satisfied in the proper season; and, in the mean time, God will send us some refreshments, during our continuance in the wilderness. And O, may divine love, and every genuine regard to God and the Lamb, prevail and govern in our hearts; and may our lives be devoted to that service, in which we hope our eternity will be employed. Have we not already, as it were, received the mark of God in our foreheads? Have we not solemnly enlisted ourselves to fight under the banner of Christ? Have we not, in repeated and most affecting solemnities and ordinances of his own institution, declared our desire of being for ever devoted to him? O let us ever remember the sacred engagement. Let holiness to the Lord be written on our hearts, as well as on our foreheads. Let all our affections, and all our faculties, all our possessions, and all our pursuits, be consecrated to God. To bear this name and inscription, will now, even in this dark and benighted world, shed a glory around us. It will be as a sacred guide to our ways, it will cheer and animate our hearts, it will bring down to us many a delightful foretaste of that world, where (if faithful,) in his light we shall see light, and where we shall reign with him for ever and ever.

Again, Let us be very thankful, that the words of this prophesy are not sealed from us; but that truths, in which we have so important a concern, are so plainly published and proclaimed. The time is near, when a seal will be set on the characters of men: blessed be God, he who is now unrighteous and polluted, may be purified and reformed, justified and saved. Adored be that grace, that waits so long upon sinners! But the divine long-suffering towards them will have its period: yet a little while, and Jesus comes, to render to every man according to his works. May we then be fixed in a world of immutable holiness and happiness!

The Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, has discovered to us many evangelical truths in this mysterious book. He has directed our eyes to himself, even to the Lamb that was slain to redeem us to God by his blood; and has shewed us the saints in glory, laying down their crowns in his presence, and ascribing the praise of all their salvation to him; but he has shewn us nothing that is inconsistent with the necessity of real and universal holiness. Yea, he himself proclaims those alone to be entitled to enter the gates of the new Jerusalem, and to eat of the fruit of the tree of life, who do God’s commandments. Let us not, therefore, deceive ourselves with vain words, nor attend to any who would sophisticate the word of God, and, fixing their view only on some detached passages of it, enervate, by their unguarded interpretations, its general scope and meaning. Let us, in reviewing scripture, observe what God commands and requires, and compare it with what he forbids, that we may thereby impartially judge and try ourselves. And how free soever we may be from any of the grosser crimes here enumerated, such as fornication, murder, and idolatry, let us not allow ourselves in the love and practice of any thing inconsistent with the immutable rule of righteousness and truth; as well knowing every allowed and continued indulgence of that kind, to be utterly irreconcilable with a well-grounded hope of inheriting eternal life. May it please thee, O Lord, to inscribe all these laws upon our hearts; that our joy, in the hope and prospect of the promised blessedness, may rise in proportion to our acquaintance with thy unerring word, and to the impartiality and diligence with which we trace the actions of our lives and the affections of our hearts by a comparison with it, and reduce them to a holy conformity to its precepts.

REFLECTIONS.1st, The angelic guide further leads the apostle to view some other emblematical glories of this celestial city.

1. He shews him a river of water of life, clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God, and of the Lamb, the figure of those eternal consolations, and that vital influence, immediately derived from communion with the Fountain of eternal bliss.

2. The tree of life, the emblem of Jesus the Lord of life and glory, here spread its branches on both sides the river; or several in a row were planted on the river’s bank, yielding perpetual fruit, new every month; and the very leaves are for the healing of the nations; intimating the rich provision of unceasing delights which is here made for the faithful, and their perfect preservation in soul and body from all decay or infirmity.

3. No curse can there enter; the eternal felicity and impeccability of the saints are secured; and before the throne of God and of the Lamb they shall pay their unceasing adorations, enjoy the beatific vision of the God of glory, and bear his bright image on them, as visibly as if his name was engraven on their foreheads.
4. No night is there; nor need they the sun or a candle, where the Lord God is their everlasting Light: and they shall reign with him for ever and ever. O blest abode! my soul, aspire after it, and eager press for an entrance into this everlasting kingdom of thy God and Saviour.
Secondly, We have,
1. A solemn ratification, given by the angel, of the certainty of these events. These sayings are faithful and true: he was sent expressly from the Lord Jesus to reveal to St. John the things which would begin shortly to be accomplished, and continue fulfilling until the end of time.

2. The Lord Jesus himself speaks, or the angel speaks as his representative: Behold, I come quickly; prepare to meet me; the whole period of time is comparatively short and momentary: blessed is he that keepeth the sayings of the prophesy of this book, faithfully adheres to the gospel word, and confidently expects the fulfilment of the promises.

3. Overcome with what he heard and saw, and scarcely himself through rapture, St. John fell before the angel; but again is reproved and prevented: angels are but our fellow-servants.
4. The Lord, or his representative angel, again addresses him, and bids him not seal up the prophesies of this book, but deliver them to the church, the time for their fulfilment now approaching: and when they are accomplished, men’s everlasting state will be fixed unchangeably. He who in the great day is found filthy and unjust, must remain so for ever under the wrath of God; and he that is found righteous in the Lord, and made holy by his Spirit, shall be eternally blessed.
5. The adorable Jesus repeats his assurance for the comfort of his faithful people. Behold, I come quickly; and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his works shall be, whether good or bad. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last; the great Origin of all things, and the ultimate End for which all things were created; and what I say may be depended upon as the words of invariable fidelity: hear them therefore with attention and regard. And, since my nature and perfections are immutable, see that the necessary change be made in yourselves in order to your obtaining that happiness of which your sins may now render you incapable. And it will shortly appear how blessed are they that do his commandments, and approve their fidelity to God, that they may have right, through the promise, to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city, partaking of all the inconceivable blessedness prepared for the faithful: while those who shall be found disobedient, unholy, or profane, shall be eternally excluded from these bright mansions. For without are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie; whoever lives and dies under the guilt of any of these things, perishes irrecoverably.

6. The Lord Jesus confirms to him what the angel had told him. I Jesus, your Lord and Master, have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in, or concerning, the churches; and their future state and condition. I am the root and the offspring of David; as God, his root; as man, his offspring; and the bright and morning star, leading my faithful people in paths of everlasting peace.

7. The Spirit and the bride say, Come, welcome the Saviour, and wait the fulfilment of his promise. And let him that heareth, even every faithful soul, take up the word and say, Come. And let him that is athirst for spiritual blessings, come: and whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely; and out of these wells of salvation, the scriptures, let him draw the living streams of grace and consolation. For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophesy of this book, if any man shall add unto these things, now the canon of revelation is complete, by new pretended visions, or wilful perversion of their meaning, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book: and if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophesy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book,an awful sanction, which guards the sacred records, and binds the heaviest vengeance upon those who dare, by base adulterations, add thereto, or diminish therefrom.

Thirdly, The Lord Jesus closes his Revelation,
1. With a solemn confirmation of the whole. He which testifieth these things, saith, Surely, I come quickly, certainly and speedily, for the comfort and salvation of my faithful people.

2. The apostle, in the name of all the saints, professes his confidence in the promise. Amen! Lord, I believe; fulfil it in due season. Even so be it; come, Lord Jesus, and bring to us complete and final salvation!

3. He concludes with his benediction. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all! May you experience the riches of his free and unmerited favour and love; be strengthened by his Spirit mightily in the inner man, to stand faithfully in the evil day, comfortably and confidently persevering in the truth; may you, when all your conflicts end, enter into that eternal state of rest and blessedness which is here revealed. Amen! Such are my prayers for thee, Reader; may we now, without ceasing, be found uniting our supplications before a throne of grace; and together may we meet around a throne of glory, and spend a happy eternity in the praises of our adored Jesus! Amen!

Fuente: Commentary on the Holy Bible by Thomas Coke

8 And I John saw these things, and heard them . And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

Ver. 8. Saw these things and heard them ] So that there is no colour of cause why any one should doubt or distrust such a witness.

I fell down to worship ] This is the second time. It is hard to say how often a saint may fall into the same sin; howbeit they sin of incogitancy; put them in mind, and they mend all. They sin of passion, and passions last not long. There is no way of wickedness in them, they make not a trade of it,Psa 139:24Psa 139:24 .

Fuente: John Trapp’s Complete Commentary (Old and New Testaments)

There is no trace of any reluctance on the prophet’s part to return to earth, as in Asc. Isa. (Gk.), 2:33 35.

Fuente: The Expositors Greek Testament by Robertson

NASB (UPDATED) TEXT: Rev 22:8-9

8I, John, am the one who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship at the feet of the angel who showed me these things. 9But he said to me, “Do not do that. I am a fellow servant of yours and of your brethren the prophets and of those who heed the words of this book. Worship God.”

Rev 22:8 This is a highly unusual verse. This is the exact problem that John had in Rev 19:10. Apparently he must have thought that this angel was deity.

Rev 22:9 “those who heed the words of this book” Christianity involves an initial decision of repentance, faith, and continuing repentance, faith, obedience, and perseverance! Revelation, written to persecuted Christians, emphasizes perseverance. The temptation for our culture today is not physical persecution, but “dry rot,” apathy, practical atheism, materialism, shallow Christianity with all benefits and no responsibility!

Fuente: You Can Understand the Bible: Study Guide Commentary Series by Bob Utley

saw, &c. The texts read “am he that heard and saw these things”.

saw. App-133.

had. Omit.

seen = saw, as above.

worship. App-137.

Fuente: Companion Bible Notes, Appendices and Graphics

Rev 22:8. [242] , and I) Dionysius of Alexandria construed this also with , blessed, Rev 22:7 : , I am, is rather to be understood.

[242] , sent) The conclusion exactly agrees with the introduction of the book.-V. g.

Fuente: Gnomon of the New Testament

Rev 22:8-11

2. JOHN’S CONFIRMATION

Rev 22:8-11

8 And I John am he that heard and saw these things. –This is a plain declaration from John that he heard the revelations in the words and saw the symbols; he wrote what occurred or he misrepresented facts and that would destroy his veracity. When the angel had shown these things the apostle, after the ancient custom, fell at his feet thinking he should be worshiped.

9 See thou do it not.–The angel promptly forbade it and offered reasons for his refusal. He declared he was a “fellow-servant” with John and other prophets. Angels, prophets of old, and the apostles were all moved by the same Spirit, and were therefore “brethren” in prophetic labors. John should no more worship the angel than the angel worship John. Moreover, the angel was a fellow servant with those who “keep the words of this book”; he obeyed God in revealing the prophecies and they obey in keeping them.

10 Seal not up the words of the prophecy of this book.–The angel further instructed John not to seal up the words of this prophecy, the reason assigned being that “the time is at hand.” That is, the time was near when the series of symbols would begin to be fulfilled, and the saints would need their instruction to aid them in successfully overcoming temptations. Regarding the seven thunders the opposite command was given, and John was told to seal them up. See notes on Rev 9:4. The explanation there of what is meant by sealing up is that be was not to write them. “Seal not up” would then mean that John was promptly to write them so the churches then in existence would have a knowledge of what they would receive for faithfulness amid trials.

11 He that is unrighteous, let him do unrighteousness still.—-The same is entioned for the filthy, and the opposite side for both characters is stated. This part of the book is not dealing with the inability of either saint or sinner to change his state after reaching the judgment, but with warnings and commands that can be heeded during the time covered by the symbols. In that period men can change, if they will; but will be lost, if they persist in sin. The only plausible application of these expressions seems to be this: with these prophecies and promises before him, if one cannot be influenced to serve God, then the truth will not reach him and he will have to continue wicked still and be lost; for, God offers to save none against his will. Do not “cast your pearls before swine” is just as appropriate now as when uttered. Those desirous of being righteous can continue to do so. The word “still” in the margin of the Revised Version is exchanged for yet more. Whatever either character determines to do, let him continue “yet more”–the only course that vindicates the justice of God and makes man responsible for his deeds.

Commentary on Rev 22:8-11 by Foy E. Wallace

Rev 22:8-9 : And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things.

John had been previously commanded not to worship the angel, but God only. (Rev 19:10) It is inconceivable that he would disobey the order by doing so here. It has been explained that John was mistaken in the identity of the angel in this instance, believing him to be Jesus. But there is no such intimation in the context. Johns memory was not so short as to have forgotten, even under the overwhelming circumstances of an angels appearance, the so recent prohibition against the worship of the angel. To the contrary, a reappearance of the angel would have reminded him of the previous command. The obviously correct view therefore is that John was here restating what had previously occurred for a necessary emphasis, just as he had quoted the words of Jesus in verse 7.

In the restatement of what had occurred in the record of chapter 19:10, John added that the angel had said: I am thy fellow-servant, and of thy brethen the prophets. This word of the angel links the apocalypse of John with those of the Old Testament, and as being of the same character, content and source; and of the same application as to their respective periods in their current history. A prophetic spiritual brotherhood had been displayed by the apocalypse, inspired by the same Spirit; even in the repeated use of the same words and phrases and the employment of the same symbols. The visions of the Old Testament prophets related to the judgments on Babylon and Egypt and to Israels deliverance from exile; and the visions of John in like manner pertained to the destruction of Jerusalem and the victory of the church over Judaism and heathenism. But the statement of the angel exalted Johns inspired credentials and authority as the author of Revelation to that of the prophets of the old dispensation.

The words of the angel further included them which keep the sayings of this book. This number included all to whom John had addressed the letters and this apocalypse and who were exhorted to read, heed and keep the things written in it. The angel classed himself as being among them all, therefore was not the object of their worship. It meant that no man or angel is to be revered or worshiped: worship God. The Son of God said to Satan, the head of the diabolical realm who was commanding his worship: It is written, thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.

Rev 22:10 : Seal not the sayings of the prophecy of this book: for the time is at hand.

The metaphor of sealing in respect to visions denoted secrecy, or that which was not ready to be disclosed. The prophet Daniel was instructed to shut up the words, and seal the book (Dan 9:24; Dan 12:4; Dan 12:9) for the events prophesied were far distant and were not at hand nor shortly to come to pass; therefore the prophet was commanded to seal up the vision; and he was told that the words of it were closed up and sealed till the time of the end. So it was with the vision of John in Rev 10:4 –the things which were not intended for disclosure he was commanded to seal up and write them not.

But in Rev 22:10 the angel enjoined John to seal not the contents of this book; and the reason was stated–for the time is at hand. For comparison again, in Dan 8:26, the prophet was directed to shut up the vision for it shall be many days; but in Rev 22:10 John was ordered to seal not . . . for the time is at hand. The time had come for the public announcement of the things enfolded in the seals and the trumpets-therefore, let it be known. This is the obvious distinction in the significance of the two commands in the phrases seal up and seal not up.

The use of the phrase the time is at hand before the visions were introduced, and in exactly the same words following so closely the order to seal not up the sayings of the vision, certainly implied with necessary inference the immediate importance of the visions; and it undeniably has the same import of immediacy as the announcement of Jesus (Mar 1:15) that the kingdom of God is at hand. The uses of this phrase in several other passages bear the same meaning and are subject to the same application. The statement of Paul (Rom 13:12) that the night is far spent, the day is at hand must be considered with his further statement (Rom 16:20) that the God of peace shall bruise Satan under your feet shortly, both of which declarations were the anticipations of the impending events.

To the Philippians (Php 4:5) he said: The Lord is at hand; and Peter said (1Pe 4:7) that the end of all things is at hand–that is, the end of the Jewish state and all things pertaining to it. To impart any other meaning to the phrase at hand in these passages, and apply them to the end of time, would amount to convicting the inspired apostles of contradictions and of teaching error on the second coming of the Lord, which was not at hand (2Th 2:2)–for he did not so come, neither as yet has done so. And if at hand can be stretched to the end of time in these instances, it obliterates the meaning of the same expressions in reference to his kingdom. It adds up to one conclusion: the siege and destruction of Jerusalem, the demolition of the temple and termination of the Jewish theocracy, together with the end of the Jewish state with its attendant tribulations, were the impending ominous events before the New Testament churches and the object of many references in the epistles of the apostles.

Admonishing the Jews of the Dispersion, James exhorted : Be ye also patient; stablish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh. The Lords second coming was not nigh–it did not occur; so it is evident that the apostles monitory declaration referred to the imminent events envisioned in Johns apocalypse. (Jas 4:7-8)

Rev 22:11 : He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, l e t him be filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still: and he that is holy, let him be holy still.

These admonitions were coupled with the warnings that the time was at hand; and the events being so near, so shortly to come to pass, no change in the characters of the wicked devotees of the imperial beast or of conditions in the heathen world could be expected; but all others were exhorted to maintain their state of righteousness and holiness, as the storm approached.

The words of this category of characters were significant. The unjust were the unbelievers in general; the filthy were those who were defiled by heathen practices; the righteous were the justified, who had obeyed the gospel; and the added term holy implied the maintaining of the life of separation from sin into which they had entered by justification. They had become righteous through justification by obedience to the gospel; they would remain holy by living apart from sin and its defilements.

The passage contains a judicial declaration upon the incorrigible heathen enemies and was indicative of the ultimate destiny where there can be no reformation; combined with an appeal to the righteous and the holy to pass through tribulation with washed robes and undefiled garments, for the threat of heathen influence would continue to be a reality, after the persecution itself had ceased. John had reverted to a pre-persecution exhortation based on what he had heard and seen in the vision; and he was obeying the command to seal not the sayings of the prophecy of this book. The purpose of the admonition was to ready and steady them for the impending onslaught.

There is an extended and continuous application of the solemn words of Rev 22:11. When all of the events of time shall have transpired, and the judgments shall have descended and shall have been executed on all of the forces of evil; the conditions of men respectively shall have been unchangeably fixed for eternity. Here may be the proper application to the everlasting state of all people in the world that has no end. The basis of the apocalyptic warning is that eternal truth.

Commentary on Rev 22:8-11 by Walter Scott

WORSHIP OF ANGELS FORBIDDEN.

GOD ALONE TO BE WORSHIPPED.

Rev 22:8-9. – And I, John (was), he who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who showed me these things. And he says to me, See (thou do it) not. I am thy fellow-bondman, and (the fellow-bondman) of thy brethren the prophets, and of those who keep the words of this book. Worship God. The name, John, occurs five times (Rev 1:1; Rev 1:4; Rev 1:9; Rev 21:2; Rev 22:8), three times at the commencement, and twice near the close of the book. Between these, however, personal pronouns referring to the Seer are of frequent occurrence. It seems foolish to raise any question as to the John of the Apocalypse. There is but one John. (An unknown John, remarks Hilgenfield, whose name has disappeared from history, leaving hardly any trace behind it, can scarcely have given commands in the name of Christ and the Spirit to the seven Churches.) Instinctively the Christian heart turns to the beloved apostle, the disciple whom Jesus loved. There was but one such, and without doubt he is the one to whom these visions and communications were vouchsafed. John is the writer of the book.

The wonderful words heard and the marvelous visions beheld, coupled with the glory and dignity of the speaker, invested the angel in the eyes of John with a right to be worshipped. But the most exalted of Gods creatures themselves worship God. No angel, however exalted his standing, but would refuse divine worship. All the angels of God worship Him (Heb 1:6). John would have fallen at the feet of the angel to worship, but the attempted action is instantly checked, for angels are very jealous in the maintenance of the rights of God and of Christ. The angel takes, even in his more exalted sphere, the place of a fellow-servant with John, with the prophets, and with those who keep the words of this book. This is the second occasion on which one of the most distinguished of men and servants failed in the presence of these glorious scenes (Rev 19:10). Worship God is the emphatic declaration of the angel. Creature worship is a sin against God, an affront to the Majesty of the Lord of hosts.

CONCLUSION OF THE ANGELS ADDRESS TO JOHN.

Rev 22:10-11. – And he says to me, Seal not the words of the prophecy of this book. The time is near. Let him that does unrighteously do unrighteously still; and let the filthy make himself filthy still; and let him that is righteous practise righteousness still; and he that is holy, let him be sanctified still. The command here given does not refer to any one prophecy, but to all contained in the book. There is a purposed contrast in the command to Daniel, Shut up the words, and seal the book, to the time of the end (Rev 12:4). Here it is seal not the words; there, seal the book. The reason given by Daniel why the words were to be shut up and the book sealed is that the time of the end was then far off. The reason given by John why he was not to seal the words of the prophecy is that the time is near. The immediate Return of the Lord was without doubt the general expectation of Christians for the first three centuries. From the moment that the Hope was revealed the time of the end is ever regarded as at hand, as near. We are living in the time of the end, and hence all prophecy lies open. What was sealed is now open for our inspection, and for our profit and learning.

Then Rev 22:11 shows the permanent condition, the immutability of the state fixed and determined at the Coming of Christ. There are two classes of bad, as opposed to two classes of good. The unrighteous as a class are contrasted with the righteous, and the filthy with the holy. Habits fix character, and character fixes destiny. Every one acts according to the truth of his nature; in this there is universal consistency. Death, or the Coming of the Lord, fixes character and destiny. The wicked remain wicked, and continue adding to their wickedness. The righteous continue righteous, and practice righteousness. In eternity sinning and suffering are united, equally so holiness and happiness. Even in the lake of fire the lost of men and angels act according to their nature; sinning and suffering goes on without cessation.

Commentary on Rev 22:8-11 by E.M. Zerr

Rev 22:8. These things refer to the vision of the celestial city and what the angel said about it. In Rev 19:10 John attempted to worship the angel but was prevented. Hence the things of our verse would have to apply to what had come before him since that time. The word worship is one of the terms in the Greek New Testament that have many shades of meaning, because it is from a dozen original words with about that many different definitions. Hence not every form or kind of worship would be condemned. The word as used in our verse and the following one, also in Rev 19:10, means to prostrate oneself before another as a recognition of superiority in rank. Such an attitude is due only to God and his Son. Angels are not superior to men as to their personal merit nor even in authority. In the great sphere of service to God the angels are only some of His servants. That is the reason that the angel assigned for his instructions to John in this place and also in Rev 19:10 refused to be worshipped. And it is the same reason why Peter refused the worship from Cornelius in Act 10:25-26 saying, “Stand up; I myself also am a man.” This does not condemn the acts of homage that are paid to kings or other dignitaries as was the custom in old time and is yet in some countries. Those performances pertain to matters of social or legal standing, while the word under consideration in our passages has to do with authority in religion. For a complete analysis of this word according to the lexicon and concordance, see the comments at Mat 2:2 in the first volume of the New Testament Commentary.

Rev 22:9. Many comments that would be suggested on this verse were made on the preceding one. There were two phases of devotion to God in which John and the angel were in the same class, namely, fellowservant and prophet. The first will apply to all of the Lord’s disciples while the second pertains to their work in predicting future events. But neither of these services entitles a man to receive worship from another, so the angel told John to worship God.

Rev 22:10. Seal is from SPHRAGIZO, which Thayer defines at the passage, “keep in silence, keep secret.” In the beginning of our study of this book, we were told that the future experiences of the church in its relations with the governments were unrevealed. That was indicated by a book (containing visions of the future) that was sealed, and it required the inspiration of Christ to reveal it. At some time before the Christian Dispensation (we know not how long) God composed the subject matter that makes up the book of Revelation, but since the events were not to be fulfilled “for many days” as Daniel was told (Dan 12:1-4), He sealed them up in the book we are studying. When the time came to begin making them known He enabled the “Lion of the tribe of Judah” to break the seals. But at the point reached by us in the vision there is nothing depending on future developments– the time is at hand–hence there is no reason for sealing it up.

Rev 22:11. The preceding verse must be remembered in connection with this one in order to get the full meaning of the passage–it is very vital. We are arrived at the judgment day (in the vision) when the final and eternal lot of all intelligent creatures will be announced for good. After this there will never be any change either for better or worse with anyone. The unjust and filthy will always be so, and the righteous and holy likewise will remain so. That is why there will never be any sin committed in Heaven by angel or man after the judgment. Neither will there be any chance for reformation on the part of the creatures in the lake of fire.

Commentary on Rev 22:8-11 by Burton Coffman

Rev 22:8

And I John am he that heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel that showed me these things.

And I John … Who is this John who writes with such assurance and authority? It is foolish to raise such a question, because there is but one John. Instinctively the Christian heart turns to the blessed apostle, that disciple whom the Lord loved.[40] As Hilgenfield remarked:

An unknown John whose name has disappeared from history, leaving hardly any trace behind it, can scarcely have given commands in the name of Christ and of the Spirit to the seven churches.[41]

I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel … Notice the startling difference between this passage and that of Rev 19:10. There, John fell down to worship the angel; here he fell down to “worship God” in the presence of the angel. One may only be astounded at the scholarly blindness to this astounding difference in the two incidents. It is not recorded here that John fell down to “worship the angel”; therefore, it must be concluded that John intended to “worship God” before the feet of the angel. Otherwise, we would have to suppose that John deliberately disobeyed the prohibition mentioned on the first occasion. John did not merely forget what he had been commanded. No! this was something different. In this event, he was directing the worship to God, but doing so “before the feet of the angel.” We deplore the fact that all of the writers whose works we have examined missed this completely. Note:

John repeats the curious incident of Rev 19:10.[42] This is the same incident which is here related again.[43] John failed to learn his lesson from the heavenly messenger in Rev 19:10.[44] This is a duplication.[45] John twice mistook an angel for the Lord Jesus Christ.[46] Either John would have removed this passage as a needless repetition, if he had had opportunity fully to revise his book, or he thought it necessary to give the same warning twice.[47]

All such views do not even see the corral, much less the mule! The overwhelming importance of these two different episodes is that they show the utter sinfulness of bowing down in the presence of even the highest angel in order to worship God.

The derivative teaching from this is that it is likewise sinful to bow down before a man, or before an image in order to worship God. The specious reasoning by which it is pretended that people bow down before images and religious prelates “to worship God” in so doing is dramatically refuted by this.

The prompt action of God’s angel in forbidding John to bow down before an angel while in the act of “worshipping God” also forbids the notion that one may bow down before men or images (both of which are far less than an angel) while in the act of worshipping God. “A Christian should assume no prostrating position”[48] before any being, or any thing, in such a manner as to suggest worship. People should worship God only through Christ; but more, they must not assume any kind of position that could suggest worship of any other being, or object. The failure to discern this truth was the basis for the justification of idol worship by the ancient pagans themselves.

Robert H. Charles, Archdeacon of Westminster, said: “The golden calves in Dan, Bethel, and Samaria were treated as outward symbols of deity, and not as deity itself.”[49] Most significantly, this is exactly the line of reasoning followed by those who seek to justify the consecration and use of sacred images in the worship of Jesus Christ today. These marvelous passages (both of them) show that it is not merely the worship of an angel (or a man, or an image) that is proscribed and forbidden to Christians, it is the bowing down before them that is also sinful, even though the purpose might be alleged as being to worship God in such a position. What a tragedy that so much of current scholarship seems totally blind to this truth. In the light of this blindness, one may wonder if a move to consecrate sacred images in many Protestant churches today would be resisted.

[40] Walter Scott, Exposition of the Revelation of Jesus Christ (Old Tappan, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, n.d.), p. 444.

[41] Hilgenfield as quoted by Walter Scott, op. cit., p. 444.

[42] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 283.

[43] John Wesley, op. cit., in loco.

[44] James D. Strauss, op. cit., p. 289.

[45] Martin Rist, op. cit., p. 545.

[46] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 661.

[47] William Barclay, op. cit., p. 224.

[48] Watchman Nee, “Come, Lord Jesus” (New York: Christian Fellowship Publishers, 1976), p. 252.

[49] Robert H. Charles, The Decalogue (Edinburgh: T. and T. Clark, 1923). p. 54.

Rev 22:9

And he saith unto me, See thou do it not: I am a fellow-servant with thee and with thy brethren the prophets, and with them that keep the words of this book: worship God.

See thou do it not … worship God … No matter how John intended it, his bowing down before the angel was sinful, and was in itself an action that was contrary to the heavenly edict, “Worship God.”

Rev 22:10

And he saith unto me, Seal not up the words of the prophecy of this book; for the time is at hand.

Seal not up the words of the prophecy of this book … “The contents of John’s prophecy have a twofold perspective.[50] “Some of the events foretold are to occur many centuries in the future”;[51] but parts of Revelation deal with events that confront John’s generation. The savage sea-beast is about to turn upon the helpless Christians. In a Roman courtroom, at the headsman’s block, or in the brutal arena, the saints are about to be called upon to face their own Calvary; and the courage to face such a trial would be immeasurably aided by the knowledge of the final victory which in God’s good time would crown the efforts of the faithful. This was what sent Paul himself to the block shouting the immortal words of 2Ti 4:8.

For the time is at hand … “The impending coming here is not the parousia, but the beginning of the persecutions.”[52]

[50] George Eldon Ladd, op. cit., p. 291.

[51] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 284.

[52] J. W. Roberts, op. cit., p. 198.

Rev 22:11

He that is unrighteous, let him do unrighteousness still: and he that is filthy, let him be made filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him do righteousness still: and he that is holy, let him be made holy still.

He that is unrighteous, let him do unrighteousness still … Apparently, John recognized that this prophecy would complete the New Testament, providing the finality of God’s revelation to man. That having been completed, “No greater power could be brought to bear upon them before He comes again.[53] This thought is that of Christ himself who said that one rising from the dead would not be any more convincing than the Scriptures (Luk 16:31). Therefore, for those who will not heed the holy Scriptures, let them go on in their wickedness. “This is a plain call for the reader to put his life in order while there is still opportunity for change.”[54] Many writers quote Swete in this context. He said, “There will come a time when change will be impossible, when no further opportunity will be given for repentance on the one hand, or apostasy on the other.”[55] However, it is probably the judicial hardening of willful and habitual sinners that best answers to what is here meant. As others have expressed it:

John is saying that there will be no opportunity for last-minute repentance.[56] Do not hinder the man who has completely hardened himself in his wickedness.[57] This is a clear refutation of the doctrine of purgatory and second chance-ism.[58] A man can so long refuse the way of Christ that in the end he cannot take it. That is the sin against the Holy Spirit.[59]

[53] J. R. Dummelow, op. cit., p. 1091.

[54] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 284.

[55] H. B. Swete, The Apocalypse of St. John (London: Macmillan, 1917), p. 305.

[56] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 259.

[57] William Hendriksen, More than Conquerors (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1956), p. 252.

[58] James D. Strauss, op. cit., p. 291.

[59] William Barclay, op. cit., p. 225.

Commentary on Rev 22:8-11 by Manly Luscombe

8 Now I, John, saw and heard these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who showed me these things. 9 Then he said to me, See that you do not do that. For I am your fellow servant, and of your brethren the prophets, and of those who keep the words of this book. Worship God. As the vision comes to an end, John assures us that he has recorded what he saw and heard. John was there. Revelation is not a figment of Johns imagination. John began to worship the angel who delivered the message. He is immediately told to arise. Angels are not to be worshipped. They worship and serve the same God we do. Angels are fellow servants. (See also Rev 19:10)

10 And he said to me, Do not seal the words of the prophecy of this book, for the time is at hand It is clear to me that John is told not close and seal this book. It is not Gods intention to record this vision and them keep it hidden and closed. God intended that the book be read publicly. (Rev 1:3) Things will be starting to happen soon. God is ready to begin fulfilling these things.

11 He who is unjust, let him be unjust still; he who is filthy, let him be filthy still; he who is righteous, let him be righteous still; he who is holy, let him be holy still. There are several explanations of this verse. I think the key is to keep it in the context of the previous verse. Verse 10 told John not to seal the book. In the statement that follows God explains that there will be no change in those who read this book. Woodruff states, Those who are unjust will still be unjust; those who are filthy will continue to be filthy; those who are righteous will remain righteous, and those who are holy will still be holy. (1, 414). Woodruff also comments, Those who were unjust before this revelation was given to John would still be unjust after is was given. The same would be true for those who were filthy, righteous, or holy. This revelation did nothing to change the way one renders obedience to Gods will. (1, 414). This book does not introduce a new plan of salvation. All who obey the gospel as taught in Acts and the epistles will be saved. God has not given a new message, a new method of salvation.

Fuente: Old and New Testaments Restoration Commentary

angel

(See Scofield “Heb 1:4”).

Fuente: Scofield Reference Bible Notes

I fell: Rev 19:10, Rev 19:19

Reciprocal: Gen 24:40 – will Jos 5:14 – fell on his Psa 95:6 – worship Psa 103:21 – ministers Dan 2:46 – fell Dan 8:17 – I was Zec 1:9 – the angel Mat 2:11 – worshipped Mat 4:9 – if Mat 8:2 – worshipped Mat 10:2 – John Mar 5:22 – he fell Mar 7:25 – at Luk 4:7 – worship me Luk 5:8 – he Joh 11:32 – she fell Act 10:25 – and fell Col 2:18 – worshipping Rev 4:10 – worship

Fuente: The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Rev 22:8. These things refer to the vision of the celestial city and what the angel said about it. IRev 19:1010 John attempted to worship the angel but was prevented. Hence the things of our verse would have to apply to what had come before him since that time. The word worship is one of the terms in the Greek New Testament that have many shades of meaning, because it is from a dozen original words with about that many different definitions. Hence not every form or kind of worship would be condemned. The word as used in our verse and the following one, also in Rev 19:10, means to prostrate oneself before another as a recognition of superiority in rank. Such an attitude is due only to God and his Son. Angels are not superior to men as to their personal merit nor even in authority. In the great sphere of service to God the angels are only some of Rev 19:10 nts. That is the reason that the angel assigned for his instructions to John in this place and also in Rev 19:10 refused to be worshipped. And it is the same reason why Peter refused the worship from Cornelius in Act 10:25-26 saying, “Stand up; I myself also am a man.” This does not condemn the acts of homage that are paid to kings or other dignitaries as was the custom in old time and is yet in some countries. Those performances pertain to matters of social or legal standing, while the word under consideration in our passages has to do with authority in religion. For a complete analysis of this word according to the lexicon and concordance, see the comments at Mat 2:2 in the first volume of the New Testament Commentary.

Rev 22:9. Many comments that would be suggested on this verse were made on the preceding one. There were two phases of devotion to God in which John and the angel were in the same class, namely, fellowservant and prophet. The first will apply to all of the Lord’s disciples while the second pertains to their work in predicting future events. But neither of these services entitles a man to receive worship from another, so the angel told John to worship God.

Comments by Foy E. Wallace

Verse 8-9.

Verses 8-9: And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things.

John had been previously commanded not to worship the angel, but God only. (Rev 19:10) It is inconceivable that he would disobey the order by doing so here. It has been explained that John wRev 22:10 en in the identity of the angel in this instance, believing him to be Jesus. But there is no such intimation in the context. John’s memory was not so short as to have forgotten, even under the overwhelming circumstances of an angel’s appearance, the so recent prohibition against the worship of the angel. To the contrary, a reappearance of the angel would have reminded him of the previous command. The obviously correct view therefore is that John was here restating what had previously occurred for a necessary emphasis, just as he had quoted the words of Jesus in verse 7.

In the restatement of what had Dan 12:1-4 n the record of Rev 19:10, John added that the angel had said: I am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethen the prophets. This word of the angel links the apocalypse of John with those of the Old Testament, and as being of the same character, content and source; and of the same application as to their respective periods in their current history. A prophetic spiritual brotherhood had been displayed by the apocalypse, inspired by the same Spirit; even in the repeated use of the same words and phrases and the employment of the same symbols. The visions of the Old Testament prophets related to the judgments on Babylon and Egypt anDan 9:24 aeDan 12:4 veDan 12:9 om exile; and the visions of John in like manner pertained to the destruction of Jerusalem and the victory of the church over Judaism and heathenism. But the statement of the angel exalted John’s inspired credentials and authority as the author of Revelation to that of the prophets oRev 10:4 d dispensation.

The words of the angel further included them which keep the sayings of this book. This numbeRev 22:10 d all to whom John had addressed the letters and this apocalypse and who were exhorted to read, heed and keep the things written in it. The aDan 8:26 ssed himself as being among them all, therefore was not the object of their worshipRev 22:10 t that no man or angel is to be revered or worshiped: worship God. The Son of God said to Satan, the head of the diabolical realm who was commanding his worship: “It is written, thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.”

Fuente: Combined Bible Commentary

Rev 22:8. And I, John, am he that heard and saw these things. Once more, as at chap. Rev 1:1; Rev 1:4, the Seer names himself, thus again binding together the opening and closing paragraphs of his book,a clear proof that by the words these things we are to understand the contents of the whole book and not merely those of its latest section. On the importance of seeing and hearing, comp. 1Jn 1:1-2.

And when I heard and saw I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things. Once before, at chap. Rev 19:10, he had done the same thing, and had been corrected for it. We need not wonder that he should do it again; nor is it necessary to think that, having just heard the words Behold, I come quickly, he may have been doubtful whether the angel before him was the Lord Himself or not. Such had been the glory of the revelations that a mistake of this kind might easily be made more than once. But, whenever made, it was needful that it should be pointed out.

Fuente: A Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Even today, it is tempting to reverse the one who taught us the glorious gospel. We must remember it is the message and the who sent it that is worthy of honor and not the messenger. ( 1Co 3:5-7 ) The angel indicates he is merely a messenger of God as were the prophets before him. He is not worthy of worship, any more than the prophets were, but God is. How interesting to realize we are co-workers with angels in God’s behalf.

Fuente: Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Rev 22:8-9. And 1 John saw these things I, who have committed these revelations to writing for the constant use of the churches, do solemnly declare they are no invention of my own, but what I was an eye and ear witness to, having really seen and heard these things in the prophetic visions granted me, as I have faithfully related them. And when I had heard, I fell down, &c. And now, my visions appearing to be at an end, I prostrated myself before the angel who had showed me these things To express the great respect and gratitude I felt for a person who had laid me under such great obligations. See on Rev 19:10. Then saith he, See thou do it not The expression, as before, in the original is short and elliptical, as is usual in showing vehement aversion: as if the apostle had said, The angel hindered me again, as he had done once before, informing me that I should not consider him as the author of these prophetic visions, but as a fellow-servant of the prophets; and, as such, employed in the service of God with them: all the praise of the church should be therefore given to God alone, who only is to be acknowledged the author of these Revelations, and who only gives the Spirit of prophecy for the encouragement and consolation of the faithful.

Fuente: Joseph Bensons Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

B. The testimony of John 22:8-11

Fuente: Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)

John resumed addressing the reader, which he had not done since Rev 1:1; Rev 1:4; Rev 1:9. He affirmed the angel’s words that the prophecy was genuine. He himself had heard and had seen the things that he had recorded (cf. Dan 8:15; Dan 12:5). He was an eyewitness of these things (cf. Joh 1:14; Joh 19:35; Joh 21:14; 1Jn 1:1-3; 1Jn 4:14).

John confessed that when he had heard and seen these things he reacted by worshipping the angel who revealed them to him (cf. Rev 19:10). It was the revelation of the new creation that evidently moved John to respond this way a second time. John’s strong reaction further attests the genuineness of the amazing revelations that he had received.

Fuente: Expository Notes of Dr. Constable (Old and New Testaments)